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High-dose NSAIDs could put your patients at risk

Assess your patient's risk

NSAID-RELATED UPPER GI ULCERS MAY OCCUR WITHOUT WARNING AND CAN FORM QUICKLY

Up to1 in 4

chronic NSAID users may get an upper GI ulcer1

70%

of these ulcers are asymptomatic–your patients may not even feel them2

Upper GI ulcers may form within

6.5 days

of starting NSAID treatment3

Know your patients’ risk factors and take appropriate measures to reduce the risk of upper GI toxicity

High-dose NSAIDs alone put your patients at moderate risk for upper GI toxicity. The American College of Gastroenterology calculates upper GI risk by evaluating several common risk factors.1

See your patient’s risk by selecting the risk factors that apply to them.1*

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Low

0 risk factors

Moderate

1-2 risk factors

High

>2 risk factors or history of a previously complicated ulcer, especially recent

Consider alternative (non-NSAID) therapy.

Upper GI risk:

Experts agree on the need for gastroprotection with NSAID use in patients at increased risk for NSAID GI toxicity1,4,5†

Do you have OA/RA patients who could be at risk for NSAID-related upper GI/gastric ulcers?

Consider ibuprofen + gastroprotection in 1 pill for your OA/RA patients

See the data

Consider naproxen + gastroprotection in 1 pill for your OA/RA patients

Get the details

*H. pylori is an independent and additive risk factor and needs to be addressed separately.

Serious GI events can occur at any time during NSAID use and without warning.6,7

GI=gastrointestinal; NSAID=nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug; OA=osteoarthritis; RA=rheumatoid arthritis.

REFERENCES

  1. Lanza FL, Chan FK, Quigley EM, Practice Parameters Committee of the American College of Gastroenterology. Guidelines for prevention of NSAID-related ulcer complications. Am J Gastroenterol. 2009;104(3):728-738.
  2. Larkai EN, Smith JL, Lidsky MD, Graham DY. Gastroduodenal mucosa and dyspeptic symptoms in arthritic patients during chronic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use. Am J Gastroenterol. 1987;82(11):1153-1158.
  3. Desai JC, Sanyal SM, Goo T, et al. Primary prevention of adverse gastroduodenal effects from short-term use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs by omeprazole 20 mg in healthy subjects: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Dig Dis Sci. 2008;53(8):2059-2065.
  4. Hochberg MC, Altman RD, April KT, et al. American College of Rheumatology 2012 recommendations for the use of nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapies in osteoarthritis of the hand, hip, and knee. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2012;64(4):465-474.
  5. Risser A, Donovan D, Heintzman J, Page T. NSAID prescribing precautions. Am Fam Physician. 2009;80(12):1371-1378.
  6. DUEXIS (ibuprofen and famotidine) [package insert]. Lake Forest, IL: Horizon Pharma USA Inc; June 2017.
  7. VIMOVO (naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium) [package insert]. Lake Forest, IL: Horizon Pharma USA, Inc; June 2018.